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Friday First and Lasts!

Happy Friday bookish people! and welcome to my new Friday segments!

It feels good to be back this week, I wasn’t able to post on Monday and Wednesday this week like I usually would because there has been so much going on, including: a trip to A and E because my boyfriend slipped on a bottle and injured his wrist and ankle and… I found out I got onto the Creative Writing PhD course that I wanted. Now starts three years of hard but rewarding work.

Anyway, back to the exciting, new Friday segments. I was talking to a friend and we were laughing about how sentences from different books can create all new sentences and that gave me the idea for this segment. I will take two books and put together their first and last sentences to see what I get, whether it works or whether it doesn’t!

I would love to hear from you all what happens when you put together the first and last sentences of some of your books, let me know some down in the comments!

I also have some thoughts of maybe turning this into a giveaway once a month or something like that so let me know what you think of that idea down in the comments too!

Last week on my Instagram – @the_blind_scribe – I asked everyone for two numbers between 1 and 405 and today I am going to show you the first five sets of first and last sentences from books chosen by the numbers I was given.

The / is where the two different sentences are split.

Up first is…

One Of Us Is Next by Karen M McManus and The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

which gives us… My sister thinks I’m a slacker/Far above the stars are watching delighted.

This actually works! It’s not the clearest sentence but it does work which is great considering how different the two books that created it are.

The second one is…

A Heart So Fierce and Broken by Brigid Kemmerer and Girl, Missing by Sophie McKenzie

which gives us… I miss knowing exactly what time it is/Girl found.

So, this one doesn’t work together which is a shame but of course, they won’t all work together but I’m still going to put them on here.

Next is…

Six Tudor Queens Kathryn Howard by Alison Weir and The Midnight Lie by Marie Rutkoski

Which gives us.. Kathryn was seven when her Mother died/ “I am a God” I tell them “and I am your Queen”.

This could work.. with a few tweaks such as changing the tense in the sentence so they are both the same which would give us – Kathryn was seven when her Mother died and “I am a God” she tells them “and I am your Queen” which would work much nicer.

The fourth one is…

Legendborn by Tracey Deonn and One Dark Throne by Kendare Blake

Which gives us… The police officer’s body goes blurry and then sharp again/there is only the sea, clear and sparkling

Like the last one, this one almost works – if the ‘and then sharp again’ part was taken out it would work much better.

Finally for today’s episode of Friday First and Lasts…

Optimists Die First by Susin Nielson and Pride and Premeditation by Tirzah Price

Which gives us… The first time I saw the bionic man I was covered in sparkles/they brought us together

This one works strangely well. It alludes to the characters being brought together by those sparkles and that sounds like a lovely thing to me.

So, that’s it for the first episode of this new segment. As I said above, comment down below with what you thought of it, any great ones you come across in your books and what you think of he giveaway idea and I’ll be back next week with some more!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Curry Compendium by Richard Sayce

Happy Friday bookish people! Today is my spot on the book tour for The Curry Compendium by Richard Sayce. Thank you to Literally PR for sending me a copy of this book to review.

This review will be different to my usual ones as a Curry Compendium doesn’t have a plot or characters to rate but I will give the book an overall rating and tell you some of my thoughts about it.

Curry Compendium: My thoughts:

So, I myself am not a lover of curries. Okay, admittedly I’ve only ever tried one and I think pepper (as in salt and pepper) is too spicy. That tells you a little something about my culinary palette. It barely exists. However, my partner loves curries and spicy food. He was very happy I received this book.

This book contains many recipes split down into clear and organised sections, each one is easy to find and easy to read through. We haven’t had the chance to make any of the recipes yet, although I’m pretty sure he is eyeing up a few of them to try and get me to taste them. The book itself is very well presented, I think the cover stands out and all the pictures are enticing.

I’d give this book a rating of

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Four stars because I know my partner is going to get a lot of enjoyment out of experimenting with the recipes and making them for his family who also enjoy eating curries.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Introducing the definitive guide to recreating British Indian Restaurant favourites from the comfort of your own home!

Lockdown saw a surge in people trying to recreate restaurant flavours at home – and now Brits want more inspiration as they get bolder in the kitchen.

In Curry Compendium, Richard Sayce expertly combines both volumes of his best-selling, Gourmand award-winning Indian Restaurant Curry at Home books, with a sprinkling of new recipes, to create the ultimate guide to cooking excellent British Indian Restaurant food in your own kitchen.

Richard Sayce, the man behind Misty Ricardo’s Curry Kitchen, is renowned by his many fans for quality recipes, attention to detail and his affable style. Having sold more than 50,000 copies of his first books, and amassing over six million views of his recipes on YouTube, there is a huge appetite for this new magnus opus packed with mouth-watering, easy-to-follow recipes.

Curry Compendium includes starters, side dishes, curries, rice and bread, along with a generous portion of vegetarian, traditional and street food style recipes. Readers benefit from supporting YouTube tutorials for the majority of recipes, each with a QR code to scan with a smartphone/tablet to watch online instantly.

Research from Bray Leino points to lockdown leading to an overwhelming rise in home cooking: 55% said they are ‘cooking more from scratch as I’m spending more time at home.’ Interestingly, the group most likely to agree with this statement was 18-34 year olds. Their 2019 report identified this group as most likely to eat fast food and use ready meals, so we’re seeing a huge behaviour shift that will impact for years to come.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Dinner Party by Sarah Gilmartin

Happy Friday bookish people! Today is my stop on the book tour for The Dinner Party by Sarah Gilmartin. Thank you to Tara McEvoy for sending me a physical copy of this book to read and review.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Dinner Party Plot:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

For most of this book I wasn’t sure there was much of a plot, but I realised this was because the author was showing us glimpses of the past intertwined with events of the present and the relationships of the characters. I liked that this book didn’t shy away from difficult topics and instead presented them in the right way.

The Dinner Party Characters:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

To me this book was very character centred. Most of the tension and the mystery was because of the relationships between the characters and I liked getting to know each of them on a deeper level than books sometimes show their characters.

The Dinner Party Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The writing in this book is lovely, clear and smooth. It also has this ominous tone to it throughout which I think added a whole other level to the story.

The Dinner Party Overall:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I gave this book three stars overall because although it was an enjoyable read, I didn’t feel all the tension in my self, I wasn’t that connected to any of the characters.

Blurb/Synopsis:

To mark the anniversary of a death in the family, Kate meticulously plans a dinner party – from the fancy table setting to the perfect baked alaska waiting in the freezer. But by the end of the night, old tensions have flared, the guests are gone, and Kate is spinning out of control.

Set between from the 1990s and the present day, from Carlow to Dublin, the family farmhouse to Trinity College, Dinner Party is a beautifully observed, dark and twisty novel that thrillingly unravels into family secrets and tragedy.

Haunting and unforgettable, it explores how the past informs the present, the inevitability of childhood damage resurfacing in later life – and yet how, despite everything, we can’t help returning home.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: Stalking Shadows by Cyla Panin

Happy Friday bookish people! Today I’m excited to be bringing you a book review of Stalking Shadows by Cyla Panin as my stop on the book tour. Thank you to TBR Tours and Beyond and Cyla Panin for sending me an ecopy of this book to read and review.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Stalking Shadows Plot:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I had heard that this book is a different take on the Beauty and the Beast retelling so I knew instantly that I wanted to read it. Anything that is even slightly reminiscent of Beauty and the Beast interests me. I loved the eerie Gothic feel to this book, it was most prominent in the settings but the whole book was filled with mystery and tension. I enjoyed the mystery and the slight creepyness of it, one thing I wanted more of was the action, I felt the story was too slow-paced for my liking and I would have liked some more intriguing events.

Stalking Shadows Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I really enjoyed the personality of the main character, Marie, she is very caring and brave and loyal to her sister. One of my favourite things about this book is the connection between the sisters, in this book they are the Beauty and the Beast rather than a love interest which was a nice change, there aren’t too many books with such a focus on the sibling relationship and having a sister myself I really felt I could put myself in Marie’s shoes.

Stalking Shadows Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

The writing in this book is very detailed and atmospheric, it helped to build up the plot layer by layer. I personally felt there was a tiny bit too much foreshadowing which sort of gave away the ending before it happened.

Stalking Shadows Overall:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I gave this book three stars overall because, although it is a very enjoyable YA debut read, I felt like I wanted a little more from the book than what it gave me.

Blurb/Synopsis:

A gothic YA fantasy debut about a young woman striving to break her sister’s curse and stop the killing in her small French town

Seventeen-year-old Marie mixes perfumes to sell on market day in her small eighteenth-century French town. She wants to make enough to save a dowry for her sister, Ama, in hopes of Ama marrying well and Marie living in the level of freedom afforded only to spinster aunts. But her perfumes are more than sweet scents in cheap, cut-glass bottles: A certain few are laced with death. Marie laces the perfume delicately—not with poison but with a hint of honeysuckle she’s trained her sister to respond to. Marie marks her victim, and Ama attacks. But she doesn’t attack as a girl. She kills as a beast.

Marking Ama’s victims controls the damage to keep suspicion at bay. But when a young boy turns up dead one morning, Marie is forced to acknowledge she might be losing control of Ama. And if she can’t control her, she’ll have to cure her. Marie knows the only place she’ll find the cure is in the mansion where Ama was cursed in the first place, home of Lord Sebastien LeClaire. But once she gets into the mansion, she discovers dark secrets hidden away—secrets of the curse, of Lord Sebastien . . . and of herself.

About the Author:

Cyla Panin is an MG, YA and Adult author who prefers to look at the world through a dusting of magic. After spending most of her childhood wanting to escape into the wonderful worlds her favourite author’s created, she’s now using her own words to craft magical places. When not writing, Cyla can be found playing dinosaurs with her two young boys, watching swashbuckling and/or period TV shows with her husband and, of course, reading.

Her YA debut, Stalking Shadows will be out with Amulet, Abrams Fall 2021. She is represented by Chloe Seager of the Madelaine Milburn Literary, TV and Film agency.

Barnes and Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/stalking-shadows-cyla-panin/1138773828

Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stalking-Shadows-Cyla-Panin/dp/1419752650

Blackwells: https://blackwells.co.uk/bookshop/product/Stalking-Shadows-by-Cyla-Panin/9781419752650

Tour schedule: https://tbrandbeyondtours.com/2021/08/19/tour-schedule-stalking-shadows-by-cyla-panin/

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Where'd I Leave It Wednesday

Where’d I Leave It Wednesday: Hampshire Crazy Golf

Happy Wednesday bookish people! I’m back with another little story about my time in Hampshire earlier this year. I haven’t been posting my Where’d I Leave It Wednesday’s for a little while because my life got a little hectic what with the move and still trying to get onto a PhD programme – there may be some good news regarding this soon so fingers crossed. But now I’m bringing them back!

I travelled to Hampshire earlier this year with my parents, my sister, my sister’s partner and his daughter. On one of the days we travelled to the seafront (don’t ask me where because I have no idea). We had actually been to a shopping centre in the morning and then we headed to the seafront which was filled with museums, shops, amusement arcades and an area that had rides and games in it.

We decided that instead of going on the rides, as I don’t like them anyway, we would play crazy golf. Now, I’m a competitive person but this goes up five levels when I’m playing crazy golf – just ask my boyfriend he knows what I’m like when we play. And if I win then I’m not going to let my opponents forget that I did.

So, we got the equipment and decided our order. I went last. The main reason for that is while playing crazy golf I’m carrying two sticks – my cane and the golf club – and I have been known to make contact with people if I don’t go last in the order. Oops.

It was going well for me to begin with, I had the lead for a few holes. But then it all went downhill. The golf ball just was not doing what I wanted it to at all! It would get close to the hole and then swerve. I swear it was doing it on purpose.

So I lost that game and I was not happy about it. I will get my rematch some day.

That’s it for this story, I’m sorry it was so short but I hope you all enjoyed it anyway.

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Chateau by Catherine Cooper

Happy Monday bookish people! Today is my spot on the book tour for The Chateau by Catherine Cooper, an intriguing murder mystery set in a castle (Chateau). Thank you to Anne Cater, Random T Tours and Harper Collins for sending me a copy of this book to read and review.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Chateau Plot:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I found this plot to be very intriguing, the first chapter throws you straight into the scene of the party and the finding of the body but it doesn’t tell you who the body is and then the first chapter goes back to before the party, sets the scene and introduces the characters. I love a murder mystery where it is set in a party, hotel or castle type place and then you have a limited amount of suspects so this was an enjoyable element of this story for me. This story got dark pretty quickly and that’s when I found myself enjoying it a little less because it was feeling like a thriller instead of a mystery that it started out like. It is described as being a thriller but the beginning felt a lot lighter and that was better for me than the end.

The Chateau Characters:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The only character that I particularly liked throughout this novel was Aura with her down to earth, seemingly sweet nature she was just trying to turn her Chateau into a lovely hotel but as I went through the book my opinion on her changed a little. I wasn’t drawn to any of the other characters, I found they were very well-written but none of them captured my attention.

The Chateau Writing and dialogue:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

In the first few chapters the writing was a little clunky but it soon found it’s feet and got smoother to read.

The Chateau Overall:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I gave this book three stars because I enjoyed the mystery for the most part, other than how dark it quickly got but I just wasn’t feeling the characters the way I like to when I’m reading books.

Blurb/Synopsis:

The twisty new thriller from the Sunday Times bestselling author of The Chalet

They thought it was perfect. They were wrong…

A glamorous chateau

Aura and Nick don’t talk about what happened in England. They’ve bought a chateau in France to make a fresh start, and their kids need them to stay together – whatever it costs.

A couple on the brink

The expat community is welcoming, but when a neighbour is murdered at a lavish party, Aura and Nick don’t know who to trust.

A secret that is bound to come out…

Someone knows exactly why they really came to the chateau. And someone is going to give them what they deserve.

The Sunday Times bestseller is back with a rollercoaster read, perfect for fans of Lucy Foley and Ruth Ware.

That’s it for this review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Tags

Top 5 Intimidating Books I Want To Read

Happy Friday bookish people! I’m back with another book tag! I was tagged in this by @moonraa23 (sorry if I’ve spelt this wrong) on Twitter, so thank you to them.

The idea of this tag is – telling you all five of the books on my TBR that I find intimidating and why. It was very difficult to get it down to just five, there’s a lot of books that anticipate me for many different reasons. Also, I will say the book title and then I will give you the synopsis of the book and then the reason that it intimidates me.

Let’s get to the first one!

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J Maas

Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

So… I read A Court of Thorns and Roses at the beginning of this year and loved it and I’m very excited to pick up A Court of Mist and Fury but it intimidates me. Simply because I’ve heard so many good things about it and especially about Rhysand that I’m worried about reading it even though I’m 99% sure I’m going to love it.

Once Upon A Broken Heart by Stephanie Garber

Evangeline Fox was raised in her beloved father’s curiosity shop, where she grew up on legends about immortals, like the tragic Prince of Hearts. She knows his powers are mythic, his kiss is worth dying for, and that bargains with him rarely end well.

But when Evangeline learns that the love of her life is about to marry another, she becomes desperate enough to offer the Prince of Hearts whatever he wants in exchange for his help to stop the wedding. The prince only asks for three kisses. But after Evangeline’s first promised kiss, she learns that the Prince of Hearts wants far more from her than she’s pledged. And he has plans for Evangeline that will either end in the greatest happily ever after, or the most exquisite tragedy… 

This book isn’t out yet, I can’t wait for it to be published! I absolutely loved the Caraval series and that’s why I’m intimidated by this one, I’m hoping I’m going to love it at least as much but we shall see once I get it in my hands and get around to reading it.

Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee

From Harper Lee comes a landmark new novel set two decades after her beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird. Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch—”Scout”—returns home from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise’s homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a MockingbirdGo Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in a painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past—a journey that can be guided only by one’s conscience. Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor and effortless precision—a profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context and new meaning to an American classic.

I really enjoyed reading To Kill A Mockingbird, luckily I didn’t read it for school otherwise I might not have enjoyed it as much. I was surprised when they brought out this book and I’m not sure on it because To Kill A Mockingbird worked perfectly as a stand-alone so I want to read it but I also don’t.

Plain Bad Heroines by Emily M Danforth

Our story begins in 1902, at The Brookhants School for Girls. Flo and Clara, two impressionable students, are obsessed with each other and with a daring young writer named Mary MacLane, the author of a scandalous bestselling memoir. To show their devotion to Mary, the girls establish their own private club and call it The Plain Bad Heroine Society. They meet in secret in a nearby apple orchard, the setting of their wildest happiness and, ultimately, of their macabre deaths. This is where their bodies are later discovered with a copy of Mary’s book splayed beside them, the victims of a swarm of stinging, angry yellow jackets. Less than five years later, The Brookhants School for Girls closes its doors forever—but not before three more people mysteriously die on the property, each in a most troubling way.

Over a century later, the now abandoned and crumbling Brookhants is back in the news when wunderkind writer, Merritt Emmons, publishes a breakout book celebrating the queer, feminist history surrounding the “haunted and cursed” Gilded-Age institution. Her bestselling book inspires a controversial horror film adaptation starring celebrity actor and lesbian it girl Harper Harper playing the ill-fated heroine Flo, opposite B-list actress and former child star Audrey Wells as Clara. But as Brookhants opens its gates once again, and our three modern heroines arrive on set to begin filming, past and present become grimly entangled—or perhaps just grimly exploited—and soon it’s impossible to tell where the curse leaves off and Hollywood begins.

A story within a story within a story and featuring black-and-white period illustrations. 

A murder mystery set in a school sounds amazing to me, and it reminds me of a more adult version of Truly Devious by Maureen Johnson a little bit but I’m intimidated by this book – not only because it is massive, but also because it might be too much of a thriller for me.

The Six Tudor Queens series by Alison Weir

I won’t give you a synopsis here because this is a whole series not just a single book. So, this one I’m intimidated by because I love books set in the Tudor Period and Philippa Gregory is one of my favourite authors but I’ve read all her books so I needed some new Tudor historical fiction and I’m hoping Alison Weir can give me that.

That’s it for this tag, I hope you all enjoyed it!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Hawthorne Legacy by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Happy Wednesday bookish people! Today is my spot on the book tour for The Hawthorne Legacy, sequel to the Inheritance Games, by Jennifer Lynn Barnes. I was so excited to receive a copy of this book to read and review, it was one of my most anticipated releases for 2021. I loved The Inheritance Games, I will be posting my review of the first book in the series later today.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Hawthorne Legacy Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book picks up almost immediately after where the inheritance Games finishes, and you as the reader are chucked right into the middle of another mystery. And what a mystery it is, I love how intricate and complex the mystery itself is, there’s so many tricks and codes and puzzles. I adore puzzles, any type so I think I would definitely be a little like the Hawthorne brothers with their competitive natures and love of solving puzzles. I really loved that I couldn’t predict where the story was going to take me, it was filled with new and exciting scenarios but also had a balance by constantly referring to things that happened in the first book.

The Hawthorne Legacy Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Avery is a wonderful character to follow, I felt like I was learning about her along with her and this made the book very interesting for me. I like that she can stand up for herself against the family that keep throwing negative things her way. Her sister Libby, there’s something about her that I just always feel like something bad is going to happen. Then there’s the Hawthorne brothers, all charming and enigmatic but also slightly dangerous it feels like. Of course, I have a favourite brother but I’m not going to say which one it is.

The Hawthorne Legacy Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I like that the writing style matches the mystery, it never reveals more than it should and this meant that I was constantly guessing and looking for clues.

The Hawthorne Legacy Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I loved getting back into the world of Avery and the Hawthorne’s.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Intrigue, riches, and romance abound in this thrilling sequel to the New York Times bestselling The Inheritance Games perfect for fans of Karen McManus and Holly Jackson.

The Inheritance Games ended with a bombshell, and now heiress Avery Grambs has to pick up the pieces and find the man who might hold the answers to all of her questions – including why Tobias Hawthorne left his entire fortune to Avery, a virtual stranger, rather than to his own daughters or grandsons.

Thanks to a DNA test, Avery knows that she’s not a Hawthorne by blood, but clues pile up hinting at a deeper connection to the family than she had ever imagined. As the mystery grows and the plot thickens, Grayson and Jameson, the enigmatic and magnetic Hawthorne grandsons, continue to pull Avery in different directions. And there are threats lurking around every corner, as adversaries emerge who will stop at nothing to see Avery out of the picture – by any means necessary.

With nonstop action, aspirational jet-setting, family intrigue, swoonworthy romance, and billions of dollars hanging in the balance, The Hawthorne Legacy will thrill Jennifer Lynn Barnes fans and new readers alike.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you’re all having a good day. Here is my third and final book review for today – A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I’ll start by saying, I loved this book. It got the right balance between light and dark for most of the book and the mystery in it was so engaging I couldn’t go to bed last night until I had finished reading it. I loved the school project element to the story and I particularly loved the brother of the boy everyone thought was the murderer teaming up with Pip. I would have liked a little bit more resistance from Ravi before he started teaming up with pip though.

A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As I was saying, I really liked following Pip and Ravi as the two main characters in this story, they had their own quirks which gave the story another layer. I felt that all of the characters were well created and although I would have liked to have seen more of some of them I could see why I didn’t and how each character fit within the story.

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I liked Holly Jackson’s writing style a lot, it allowed for the serious moments and the light hearted ones very well and it helped me enjoy reading it even more.

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall and I am really excited about getting to the sequel soon.

Blurb/Synopsis:

The case is closed. Five years ago, schoolgirl Andie Bell was murdered by Sal Singh. The police know he did it. Everyone in town knows he did it.

But having grown up in the same small town that was consumed by the murder, Pippa Fitz-Amobi isn’t so sure. When she chooses the case as the topic for her final year project, she starts to uncover secrets that someone in town desperately wants to stay hidden. And if the real killer is still out there, how far will they go to keep Pip from the truth?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am posting three book reviews, of which this is the second. This book review is for Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each of them. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Moonflower Murders Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This is the kind of mystery that I really enjoy, someone gets murdered and another goes missing and it all relates back to the hotel they both have a connection to and because of this hotel there’s only a certain number of suspects. It reminds me of Agatha Christie style murder mysteries and they are just my favourite.The plot itself is really engaging, although the book is about 600 pages long I flew through it because it is so complex and so well created that the mystery surrounds you and you can’t stop reading until it is solved.

Moonflower Murders Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There’s too many characters to talk about them here individually but each and every one of them I went through thinking they were a suspect, except for the detective of course, and they are so well created that any one of them could have been the killer. I enjoyed getting to know each of the characters better because they each had their own part to play in the story which meant I got to see a lot of each of them.

Moonflower Murders Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I really enjoyed Anthony Horowitz’s writing style, it lended itself well to the mystery. One thing that I didn’t like as much was the inclusion of the entire Atticus Pund takes the case story, I felt it was a bit unnecessary.

Moonflower Murders Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars because it was a great read and a very enjoyable mystery.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Featuring his famous literary detective Atticus Pund and Susan Ryeland, hero of the worldwide bestseller Magpie Murders, a brilliantly complex literary thriller with echoes of Agatha Christie from New York Times bestselling author Anthony Horowitz.

Retired publisher Susan Ryeland is living the good life. She is running a small hotel on a Greek island with her long-term boyfriend Andreas. It should be everything she’s always wanted. But is it? She’s exhausted with the responsibilities of making everything work on an island where nothing ever does, and truth be told she’s beginning to miss London.

And then the Trehearnes come to stay. The strange and mysterious story they tell, about an unfortunate murder that took place on the same day and in the same hotel in which their daughter was married—a picturesque inn on the Suffolk coast named Farlingaye Halle—fascinates Susan and piques her editor’s instincts. 

One of her former writers, the late Alan Conway, author of the fictional Magpie Murders, knew the murder victim—an advertising executive named Frank Parris—and once visited Farlingaye Hall. Conway based the third book in his detective series, Atticus Pund Takes the Cake, on that very crime. 

The Trehearne’s, daughter, Cecily, read Conway’s mystery and believed the book proves that the man convicted of Parris’s murder—a Romanian immigrant who was the hotel’s handyman—is innocent. When the Trehearnes reveal that Cecily is now missing, Susan knows that she must return to England and find out what really happened.

Brilliantly clever, relentlessly suspenseful, full of twists that will keep readers guessing with each revelation and clue, Moonflower Murders is a deviously dark take on vintage English crime fiction from one of its greatest masterminds, Anthony Horowitz.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!