Book Reviews

Book Review: The Ex Hex by Erin Sterling

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day today. Today I am bringing you my book review of the Ex Hex by Erin Sterling. I hope you all enjoy it.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will do my best to avoid any spoilers.

The Ex Hex Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book was a fun, witchy contemporary read to split up my reading of murder mysteries and fantasy. This book follows Vivi who, while going through a bad breakup, accidentally curses her ex and then when he comes back to town things start happening. The book did start to take on quite a serious tone towards the end which didn’t really fit the rest of the book in my opinion but most of the plot I did enjoy.

The Ex Hex Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I loved Vivi as a main character, she is witty and sarcastic and a very strong female character, I didn’t always agree with her choices and in her place I definitely wouldn’t have done some of the things she did but I still enjoyed reading her story.

The Ex Hex writing and dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There’s not a lot for me to say here, only that the pace and tone kept up with the plot very well and the writing was clear.

The Ex Hex overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because it was a fun palette cleanser in the middle of a readathon.

Blurb/Synopsis:

New York Times bestselling author Rachel Hawkins, writing as Erin Sterling, casts a spell with a spine-tingling romance full of wishes, witches, and hexes gone wrong.

Nine years ago, Vivienne Jones nursed her broken heart like any young witch would: vodka, weepy music, bubble baths…and a curse on the horrible boyfriend. Sure, Vivi knows she shouldn’t use her magic this way, but with only an “orchard hayride” scented candle on hand, she isn’t worried it will cause him anything more than a bad hair day or two.

That is until Rhys Penhallow, descendent of the town’s ancestors, breaker of hearts, and annoyingly just as gorgeous as he always was, returns to Graves Glen, Georgia. What should be a quick trip to recharge the town’s ley lines and make an appearance at the annual fall festival turns disastrously wrong. With one calamity after another striking Rhys, Vivi realizes her silly little Ex Hex may not have been so harmless after all.

Suddenly, Graves Glen is under attack from murderous wind-up toys, a pissed off ghost, and a talking cat with some interesting things to say. Vivi and Rhys have to ignore their off the charts chemistry to work together to save the town and find a way to break the break-up curse before it’s too late.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Three Dog Problem by S J Bennett

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day today. I am bringing you my book review for The Three Dog Problem by S J Bennett, the sequel to The Windsor Knot.

In this book review I will be giving star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will do my best to not include any spoilers.

The Three Dog Problem Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This series is sold as a mystery story where the Queen is the one investigating and solving the crime, this isn’t exactly true. It’s the Queen and a few other people so as long as you don’t go in thinking it is only the Queen on her own solving the crime you won’t be disappointed. I quite enjoy how this book series stands out from other books in the mystery genre. I personally enjoyed this second book in the series more than the first book, I think the first book had too many elements and the twists were like sharp corners whereas in this book they were set up a bit more throughout the book which gave you the chance to try and guess what was going to happen.

The Three Dog Problem Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Obviously The Queen is one of the main characters in this series and she is presented very well, the right balance between regal and mischievous. She is the brains of the whole thing even though she doesn’t let everyone in on that secret.

The Three Dog Problem Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I like the writing in this series because it carries a light tone for half of the book and then you feel the tone get darker as you get closer to the reveal and that is something I enjoy in a book, also, the pace changes perfectly in accordance to the plot.

The Three Dog Problem Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I really enjoy the difference from other books in the genre and how the mystery unfolds in each book.

Blurb/Synopsis

In the wake of a referendum which has divided the nation, the last thing the Queen needs is any more problems to worry about. But when an oil painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia – first given to the Queen in the 1960s – shows up unexpectedly in a Royal Navy exhibition, she begins to realise that something is up.

When a body is found in the Palace swimming pool, she finds herself once again in the middle of an investigation which has more twists and turns than she could ever have suspected. With her trusted secretary Rozie by her side, the Queen is determined to solve the case. But will she be able to do it before the murderer strikes again?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Mystery of Three Quarters by Sophie Hannah

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day today. I am bringing you my review of The Mystery of Three Quarters by Sophie Hannah, one of the books in her new Poirot book series.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will do my best to not include any spoilers.

The Mystery of Three Quarters Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This was the third of Sophie Hannah’s Poirot books that I have read and in this one Poirot finds out that someone has sent seemingly unconnected people letters accusing them of being a murderer and they have been signed as if by Poirot himself. I found this premise very interesting, it throws the reader into the suspense from the first page and that is one thing I really enjoy in mystery books, I like to feel apart of the mystery from early on.

The Mystery of Three Quarters Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Of course the main character in this book is Poirot. I have always loved anything to do with Poirot, since I was a child and I used to watch all the David Suchet episodes on TV on a Sunday while eating my lunch and of course I have read many of the Agatha Christie books. I think it’s where my love of crime fiction started.

The Mystery of Three Quarters Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

It must have taken a lot of research for Sophie Hannah to begin writing these books because there have been a lot of adaptations of Poirot but I think that she captures his mannerisms and speech very well.

The Mystery of Three Quarters Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I enjoyed this one just as much as the rest of the other two in the series I have read.

Blurb/Synopsis:

The world’s most beloved detective, Hercule Poirot, the legendary star of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express and most recently The Monogram Murders and Closed Casket, returns in a stylish, diabolically clever mystery set in the London of 1930.

Hercule Poirot returns home after an agreeable luncheon to find an angry woman waiting to berate him outside his front door. Her name is Sylvia Rule, and she demands to know why Poirot has accused her of the murder of Barnabas Pandy, a man she has neither heard of nor ever met. She is furious to be so accused, and deeply shocked. Poirot is equally shocked, because he too has never heard of any Barnabas Pandy, and he certainly did not send the letter in question. He cannot convince Sylvia Rule of his innocence, however, and she marches away in a rage.

Shaken, Poirot goes inside, only to find that he has a visitor waiting for him — a man called John McCrodden who also claims also to have received a letter from Poirot that morning, accusing him of the murder of Barnabas Pandy…

Poirot wonders how many more letters of this sort have been sent in his name. Who sent them, and why? More importantly, who is Barnabas Pandy, is he dead, and, if so, was he murdered? And can Poirot find out the answers without putting more lives in danger?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Marlow Murder Club by Robert Thorogood

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day today. I am bringing you my book review of The Marlow Murder Club by Robert Thorogood.

As always in this book review I will be giving star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will do my best to avoid any spoilers.

The Marlow Murder Club Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I have to be honest, I went into this book with some preconceptions. First was that I had already read The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman a while before this and I had heard that they were similar and they were a bit, the characters were in the older age group and the overall tone of the book is quite light. For me that was the end of the similarities which I was happy about because I ended up enjoying The Marlow Murder Club more then The Thursday Murder Club. The other preconception I had was that Robert Thorogood wrote a lot of the Death In Paradise episodes and my friend and I have seen every single episode, we love the series, actually we compete over it to see who gets the most right by the end of each series. I was worried that the book would feel like a repeat of one of the episodes, and personally that meant that I was a bit disappointed by the ending of this book because, without spoiling anything, I was able to guess the ending early on because it was a similar plot to one of the episodes.

The Marlow Murder Club Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Judith Potts is the main character (there are more of them in the group later in the book but I won’t spoil anything) and I really felt like I could relate to her, an elderly lady who can’t help herself but be nosy. That’s definitely going to be me. It’s really hard to talk about the characters in this book without spoiling anything so I won’t say too much more but I will say I loved the energy of Judith Potts and her friends, this book was a great introduction to them and I hope that we will see more of them in coming books.

The Marlow Murder Club Writing and Dialogue

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As I said earlier, this book has a very light tone to it, there’s a lot of comedic elements to it which was something that I thought worked really well for the mystery in this book.

The Marlow Murder Club Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Overall, I gave this book a rating of four stars because I enjoyed the gathering pace of the novel and I thought the mystery was well-plotted, the only thing I didn’t enjoy was the ending and how similar it was to the episodes of Death In Paradise.

Blurb/Synopsis:

To solve an impossible murder, you need an impossible hero…

Judith Potts is seventy-seven years old and blissfully happy. She lives on her own in a faded mansion just outside Marlow, there’s no man in her life to tell her what to do or how much whisky to drink, and to keep herself busy she sets crosswords for The Times newspaper.

One evening, while out swimming in the Thames, Judith witnesses a brutal murder. The local police don’t believe her story, so she decides to investigate for herself, and is soon joined in her quest by Suzie, a salt-of-the-earth dog-walker, and Becks, the prim and proper wife of the local Vicar.

Together, they are the Marlow Murder Club.

When another body turns up, they realise they have a real-life serial killer on their hands. And the puzzle they set out to solve has become a trap from which they might never escape…

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Dangerous Women by Hope Adams

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you’re all having a good day today. I am bringing you the book review for Dangerous Women by Hope Adams.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Dangerous Women Plot

Rating: 4 out of 5.

In this book the reader is transported into the world of a Women’s convict ship on it’s many weeks travelling across the sea to Australia for a new life. Then one of the women gets murdered. Not only is this book highly atmospheric, it has layers of tension, imagery and mystery and it is one of my favourite books of 2022 so far. I have recently been loving the historical mysteries and this novel fits in that genre perfectly. There’s not a lot I can say about this plot without spoiling anything because it is full of twists but I can say that if you like mystery books I would definitely recommend this book to you.

Dangerous Women Characters

Rating: 4 out of 5.

In this book you are mainly focused on the women as the main characters, and there are quite a few of them with their own important link to the plot, you also see the captain often. By following these characters I got very attached to a few of them, in particular the group of ladies who are part of the sewing group. This book, although it has a strong plot, is very character driven which I think works very well.

Dangerous Women Writing and Dialogue

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book is told from multiple perspectives which adds a very interesting layer to the mystery because you as the reader are learning things that the other characters might not know. I’m not usually the biggest fan of multiple perspectives but for this book it works.

Dangerous Women Overall

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because it was a fast-paced, high stakes historical mystery and I enjoyed it.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Nearly two hundred condemned women on board a sailing ship bound for Australia. One of them is a murderer. From debut author Hope Adams comes a thrilling novel based on the 1841 voyage of the convict ship Rajah, about confinement, hope, and the terrible things we do to survive.

London, 1841. One hundred eighty Englishwomen file aboard the Rajah, embarking on a three-month voyage to the other side of the world.

They’re daughters, sisters, mothers–and convicts.

Transported for petty crimes.

Except one of them has a deadly secret, and will do anything to flee justice.

As the Rajah sails farther from land, the women forge a tenuous kinship. Until, in the middle of the cold and unforgiving sea, a young mother is mortally wounded, and the hunt is on for the assailant before he or she strikes again.

Each woman called in for question has something to fear: Will she be attacked next? Will she be believed? Because far from land, there is nowhere to flee, and how can you prove innocence when you’ve already been found guilty?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: A Marvelous Light by Freya Marske

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am bringing you the book review for A Marvelous Light by Freya Marske.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each of them. I will do my best to not include any spoilers. I hope you enjoy my book review.

A Marvelous Light Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book opened with a bang. The first chapter threw me right into the middle of a magical conflict over an unknown item and I then felt that I was learning about the world and the mystery along with the main character, Robin.

I really loved how this book followed the mystery, each time you think you know where the story is going to go next it switched direction and I thought this worked very well for keeping me engaged in the story. I have heard that this book is the first in a series and I could tell by the way it ends that there is plenty more to be explored in this world yet.

A Marvelous Light Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The two main characters that you get to see a lot of are Robin and Edwin. I absolutely loved both of these characters. Edwin kept referring to Robin as a man who would be the sort of ‘jock’ character at school, a wealthy man who played a lot of sports. I personally didn’t get this feeling from the character, to me he felt shy and reserved despite the story trying to present Edwin as this character.

I wished there had been more scenes to see their relationship be established in the beginning half of the book, I felt that their feelings towards each other changed within an instant at a certain point in the book and for me it happened too quickly.

A Marvelous Light Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I believe this book is a debut by this author and there is some feeling of this in the writing but overall I thought that the writing was easy to read and enjoyable.

A Marvelous Light Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I thought it was a fun and mysterious opening book for a series that I definitely want to continue with.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Red White & Royal Blue meets Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell in debut author Freya Marske’s A Marvellous Light, featuring an Edwardian England full of magic, contracts, and conspiracies.

Robin Blyth has more than enough bother in his life. He’s struggling to be a good older brother, a responsible employer, and the harried baronet of a seat gutted by his late parents’ excesses. When an administrative mistake sees him named the civil service liaison to a hidden magical society, he discovers what’s been operating beneath the unextraordinary reality he’s always known.

Now Robin must contend with the beauty and danger of magic, an excruciating deadly curse, and the alarming visions of the future that come with it—not to mention Edwin Courcey, his cold and prickly counterpart in the magical bureaucracy, who clearly wishes Robin were anyone and anywhere else.

Robin’s predecessor has disappeared, and the mystery of what happened to him reveals unsettling truths about the very oldest stories they’ve been told about the land they live on and what binds it. Thrown together and facing unexpected dangers, Robin and Edwin discover a plot that threatens every magician in the British Isles—and a secret that more than one person has already died to keep.

That’s it for this book review, i hope you all enjoyed it! Have you read this book? Did you enjoy it?

Book Reviews

Book Review: Mad Woman by Louisa Treger

Happy Tuesday bookish people! I was lucky enough to receive a copy of Mad Woman by Louisa Treger from the author and today I am sharing with you my review of it. If you’re interested in getting a copy of this book yourself it’s publication date is the 9th June 2022.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and write a little bit about each one. I will do my best to not include any spoilers. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Mad Woman Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Mad Woman is an historical novel based on the true story of Nellie Bly. Going into this book I will be honest, I had heard of Nellie Bly but I didn’t know anything about her or what she did. The first page of this novel drags you into the mysterious depths of the book by starting in what seems to be a dangerous situation and you as a reader have no idea how or why the character has ended up there. I loved how this book began because I became emotionally invested in the character immediately, then you slowly learn her backstory interspersed with emotive, sensory descriptions of the situation she is in now. It is hard to talk much about the plot because there’s so many secrets that come to light throughout and I don’t want to spoil anything for another reader because I honestly enjoyed every minute of this book. One of my favourite things about this book was it’s bleak truthfulness, it didn’t shy away from the extreme descriptions and it didn’t ignore the very real consequences of what Nellie Bly goes through.

Mad Woman Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As I said before, Nellie Bly is the main character. She is a woman with determination and big ambitions in a world full of people who want to obstruct her. I really felt for this woman because she wanted to bring a voice to the people who didn’t have one: women, the poor, the ‘insane’. I felt each moment of hardship and because of the power of the story I also felt the anger and the despair that Nellie Bly was feeling.

Mad Woman Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book is incredibly well written, I sped through it because the writing kept up with the pace of the story and it was brutal and honest in the way it was told. Even the chapters about the character’s childhood and family were told in the way that look, here is what I went through and this is how it made me. I thought it was very powerful writing.

Mad Woman Overall

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I felt it was a powerful and important read and I really enjoyed the experience.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Based on a true story, a spellbinding historical novel about the world’s first female investigative journalist, Nellie Bly.

In 1887, young Nellie Bly sets out for New York and a career in journalism, determined to make her way as a serious reporter, whatever that may take.

But life in the city is tougher than she imagined. Down to her last dime and desperate to prove her worth, she comes up with a dangerous plan: to fake insanity and have herself committed to the asylum on Blackwell’s Island. There, she will work undercover to expose the asylum’s wretched conditions.

But when the asylum door swings shut behind her, she finds herself in a place of horrors, governed by a cruelty she could never have imagined. Cold, isolated and starving, her days of terror reawaken the traumatic events of her childhood. She entered the asylum of her own free will – but will she ever get out?

An extraordinary portrait of a woman ahead of her time, Madwoman is the story of a quest for the truth that changed the world. 

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Throne of Glass by Sarah J Maas

Happy Monday bookish people! As you can see by the title of this post – I finally read Throne of Glass! It’s taken me years, it has been on multiple TBRs but I never actually picked it up and read it. I actually read A Court of thorns and roses (only the first one) and House of Earth and Blood (the first Crescent City book) before I got around to reading this one. I took it to london with me and started reading it on the train journey up there. I finished it in the hotel room the next night.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep this review as spoiler free as possible. I hope you all enjoy my book review.

Throne of Glass Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This plot had me hooked from the very beginning, what would a Prince want with an assassin? and it just kept getting better from there. I really love competitions in books – I have a lot of fantasy books with this trope – and this one was good, it took a backseat to the building of relationships and the other mysteries that were going on but it still made the book enjoyable for me. What I especially liked about this plot was that there was one, a lot of first books in series sort of forget about having a well thought-out and complete plot, but this one didn’t. There was a good balance between plot strands that were sorted out in this book and the ones that are going to be underlying mysteries throughout the series.

Throne of Glass Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Caelena is a great lead character. She’s a fighter and it is obvious in every action, and she has been through a lot which means she finds it hard to trust other people. I liked the inner turmoil the character was struggling with throughout and I hope that will be there in different ways throughout the series. Also in the book is Prince Dorian, who I did like but I thought there was room to expand his character, which might happen in the coming books, because he seemed charming and a good friend but there was also some jealousy.

Throne of Glass Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I already knew going into this book that I like Sarah J Maas’ writing style and especially her dialogue. If you’ve been reading my reviews a while you will know that dialogue is one of my favourite parts of a book and I enjoyed that aspect a lot in this book.

Throne of Glass Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I enjoyed the book, as I knew I would, and I am excited to see where the rest of the series goes.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Meet Celaena Sardothien.

Beautiful. Deadly. Destined for greatness.

In a land without magic, where the king rules with an iron hand, Celaena, an assassin, is summoned to the castle. She comes not to kill the king, but to win her freedom. If she defeats twenty-three killers, thieves, and warriors in a competition, she is released from prison to serve as the king’s champion.

The Crown Prince will provoke her. The Captain of the Guard will protect her. But something evil dwells in the castle of glass—and it’s there to kill. When her competitors start dying one by one, Celaena’s fight for freedom becomes a fight for survival, and a desperate quest to root out the evil before it destroys her world.

That’s it for this review, I hope you all enjoyed it! If you have read this book let me know what you thought of it in the comments.

Book Reviews

Book Review: Bringing Down The Duke by Evie Dunmore

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am bringing you the book review for Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore. I read this book on the train while on the way home from Londond.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep this review as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Bringing Down The Duke Plot:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

This story is about a woman who is not only a women at Oxford in a period when women weren’t accepted as intelligent, free-thinking people, but she also becomes part of the suffragist movement. First of all, I loved this take on historical fiction, it gave me a lovely sense of conflict and tension from the very beginning. Because of this involvement she gets mixed up with the Duke of Montgomery. So, this plot is a bit too far on the romance side for me, I enjoyed it don’t get me wrong but I thought the plot itself lacked a little and was used as a catalyst to bring the romance in as the main element. I would have liked more of an overall story but it was okay for a quick, calm read on the train home.

Bringing Down the Duke Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I have to say the characters were what made this book enjoyable for me. Annabelle is such a strong female lead character and although she does some things in the book I didn’t agree with her personality makes up for it, I liked her and I cared about whether or not she was going to get the life she deserved.

Then there’s the Duke of Montgomery and I also liked his character, up to a point. To begin with he seems moody and he makes assumptions to quickly but you see this is a miscommunication then a bit later on there is one scene that ruined his character for me, the way he acts towards Annabelle instantly says to me that I would not like this man at all.

Bringing Down the Duke Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I think the writing in this book is okay, it is smooth and clear and it does paint the picture, especially for the setting but it’s not my favourite style of writing, this could be because of the genre as well.

Bringing Down the Duke Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because at the time of reading it, I did enjoy it but thinking about it later I am not as sure on my enjoyment of it.

Blurb/Synopsis:

England, 1879. Annabelle Archer, the brilliant but destitute daughter of a country vicar, has earned herself a place among the first cohort of female students at the renowned University of Oxford. In return for her scholarship, she must support the rising women’s suffrage movement. Her charge: recruit men of influence to champion their cause. Her target: Sebastian Devereux, the cold and calculating Duke of Montgomery who steers Britain’s politics at the Queen’s command. Her challenge: not to give in to the powerful attraction she can’t deny for the man who opposes everything she stands for.

Sebastian is appalled to find a suffragist squad has infiltrated his ducal home, but the real threat is his impossible feelings for green-eyed beauty Annabelle. He is looking for a wife of equal standing to secure the legacy he has worked so hard to rebuild, not an outspoken commoner who could never be his duchess. But he wouldn’t be the greatest strategist of the Kingdom if he couldn’t claim this alluring bluestocking without the promise of a ring… or could he?

Locked in a battle with rising passion and a will matching her own, Annabelle will learn just what it takes to topple a duke….

A stunning debut for author Evie Dunmore and her Oxford suffragists in which a fiercely independent vicar’s daughter takes on a powerful duke in a fiery love story that threatens to upend the British social order.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Rose by Holly Webb

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day today. I am bringing you my review of Rose by Holly Webb, a series about a young girl from an orphanage in Victorian London (I think) who goes to work in the house of a magician.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Rose Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I like that the plot of this story really has three strands to it: Rose leaving the orphanage and entering the world of being an under-housemaid, Rose finding out new things about herself, and the disappearing children in the town.
This plot is one that I have reread multiple times because I love the worldbuilding aspects and the way that new information comes to light throughout. I also really enjoy the way that this plot tests the boundaries of children’s fiction and includes the darker elements alongside the fantastic magical elements. There is also a big theme of friendship in this book and being brave to protect your friends.

Rose Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There are many well-crafted characters in this book but Rose is the protagonist. She is exploring the new, outside world that she hasn’t experienced because of being in the orphanage and it was fun to explore it with her, especially as she finds out more secrets about herself. Freddie is the Apprentice of the magician and he is stuck up and cold in the beginning but it was really nice to see his character develop throughout the novel. There is also Isabella, the daughter of the magician, she is prone to tantrums and is frequently described as spoilt, but she is also intelligent and an integral part of this book.

Rose writing and dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

One of my favourite things about this book is how the writing stands the test of time. I enjoyed it when I was younger and I like it the same amount now, the writing style does not feel too young for me and because the plot follows child aged characters the plot doesn’t feel too young either.

Rose Overall:

I gave this book four stars because it is a book that I will happily reread multiple times.

Blurb/Synopsis:

The grand residence of the famous alchemist, Mr Fountain, is a world away from the dark orphanage Rose has left behind. For the house is positively overflowing with sparkling magic—she can feel it. And it’s not long before Rose realises that maybe, just maybe, she has a little bit of magic in her, too. . . .

The first book in an exciting, get-lost-in-the-world series about orphans, alchemy, magical powers and sinister child-catchers.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!