blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Curry Compendium by Richard Sayce

Happy Friday bookish people! Today is my spot on the book tour for The Curry Compendium by Richard Sayce. Thank you to Literally PR for sending me a copy of this book to review.

This review will be different to my usual ones as a Curry Compendium doesn’t have a plot or characters to rate but I will give the book an overall rating and tell you some of my thoughts about it.

Curry Compendium: My thoughts:

So, I myself am not a lover of curries. Okay, admittedly I’ve only ever tried one and I think pepper (as in salt and pepper) is too spicy. That tells you a little something about my culinary palette. It barely exists. However, my partner loves curries and spicy food. He was very happy I received this book.

This book contains many recipes split down into clear and organised sections, each one is easy to find and easy to read through. We haven’t had the chance to make any of the recipes yet, although I’m pretty sure he is eyeing up a few of them to try and get me to taste them. The book itself is very well presented, I think the cover stands out and all the pictures are enticing.

I’d give this book a rating of

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Four stars because I know my partner is going to get a lot of enjoyment out of experimenting with the recipes and making them for his family who also enjoy eating curries.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Introducing the definitive guide to recreating British Indian Restaurant favourites from the comfort of your own home!

Lockdown saw a surge in people trying to recreate restaurant flavours at home – and now Brits want more inspiration as they get bolder in the kitchen.

In Curry Compendium, Richard Sayce expertly combines both volumes of his best-selling, Gourmand award-winning Indian Restaurant Curry at Home books, with a sprinkling of new recipes, to create the ultimate guide to cooking excellent British Indian Restaurant food in your own kitchen.

Richard Sayce, the man behind Misty Ricardo’s Curry Kitchen, is renowned by his many fans for quality recipes, attention to detail and his affable style. Having sold more than 50,000 copies of his first books, and amassing over six million views of his recipes on YouTube, there is a huge appetite for this new magnus opus packed with mouth-watering, easy-to-follow recipes.

Curry Compendium includes starters, side dishes, curries, rice and bread, along with a generous portion of vegetarian, traditional and street food style recipes. Readers benefit from supporting YouTube tutorials for the majority of recipes, each with a QR code to scan with a smartphone/tablet to watch online instantly.

Research from Bray Leino points to lockdown leading to an overwhelming rise in home cooking: 55% said they are ‘cooking more from scratch as I’m spending more time at home.’ Interestingly, the group most likely to agree with this statement was 18-34 year olds. Their 2019 report identified this group as most likely to eat fast food and use ready meals, so we’re seeing a huge behaviour shift that will impact for years to come.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Hawthorne Legacy by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Happy Wednesday bookish people! Today is my spot on the book tour for The Hawthorne Legacy, sequel to the Inheritance Games, by Jennifer Lynn Barnes. I was so excited to receive a copy of this book to read and review, it was one of my most anticipated releases for 2021. I loved The Inheritance Games, I will be posting my review of the first book in the series later today.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Hawthorne Legacy Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book picks up almost immediately after where the inheritance Games finishes, and you as the reader are chucked right into the middle of another mystery. And what a mystery it is, I love how intricate and complex the mystery itself is, there’s so many tricks and codes and puzzles. I adore puzzles, any type so I think I would definitely be a little like the Hawthorne brothers with their competitive natures and love of solving puzzles. I really loved that I couldn’t predict where the story was going to take me, it was filled with new and exciting scenarios but also had a balance by constantly referring to things that happened in the first book.

The Hawthorne Legacy Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Avery is a wonderful character to follow, I felt like I was learning about her along with her and this made the book very interesting for me. I like that she can stand up for herself against the family that keep throwing negative things her way. Her sister Libby, there’s something about her that I just always feel like something bad is going to happen. Then there’s the Hawthorne brothers, all charming and enigmatic but also slightly dangerous it feels like. Of course, I have a favourite brother but I’m not going to say which one it is.

The Hawthorne Legacy Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I like that the writing style matches the mystery, it never reveals more than it should and this meant that I was constantly guessing and looking for clues.

The Hawthorne Legacy Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I loved getting back into the world of Avery and the Hawthorne’s.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Intrigue, riches, and romance abound in this thrilling sequel to the New York Times bestselling The Inheritance Games perfect for fans of Karen McManus and Holly Jackson.

The Inheritance Games ended with a bombshell, and now heiress Avery Grambs has to pick up the pieces and find the man who might hold the answers to all of her questions – including why Tobias Hawthorne left his entire fortune to Avery, a virtual stranger, rather than to his own daughters or grandsons.

Thanks to a DNA test, Avery knows that she’s not a Hawthorne by blood, but clues pile up hinting at a deeper connection to the family than she had ever imagined. As the mystery grows and the plot thickens, Grayson and Jameson, the enigmatic and magnetic Hawthorne grandsons, continue to pull Avery in different directions. And there are threats lurking around every corner, as adversaries emerge who will stop at nothing to see Avery out of the picture – by any means necessary.

With nonstop action, aspirational jet-setting, family intrigue, swoonworthy romance, and billions of dollars hanging in the balance, The Hawthorne Legacy will thrill Jennifer Lynn Barnes fans and new readers alike.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you’re all having a good day. Here is my third and final book review for today – A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I’ll start by saying, I loved this book. It got the right balance between light and dark for most of the book and the mystery in it was so engaging I couldn’t go to bed last night until I had finished reading it. I loved the school project element to the story and I particularly loved the brother of the boy everyone thought was the murderer teaming up with Pip. I would have liked a little bit more resistance from Ravi before he started teaming up with pip though.

A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As I was saying, I really liked following Pip and Ravi as the two main characters in this story, they had their own quirks which gave the story another layer. I felt that all of the characters were well created and although I would have liked to have seen more of some of them I could see why I didn’t and how each character fit within the story.

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I liked Holly Jackson’s writing style a lot, it allowed for the serious moments and the light hearted ones very well and it helped me enjoy reading it even more.

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall and I am really excited about getting to the sequel soon.

Blurb/Synopsis:

The case is closed. Five years ago, schoolgirl Andie Bell was murdered by Sal Singh. The police know he did it. Everyone in town knows he did it.

But having grown up in the same small town that was consumed by the murder, Pippa Fitz-Amobi isn’t so sure. When she chooses the case as the topic for her final year project, she starts to uncover secrets that someone in town desperately wants to stay hidden. And if the real killer is still out there, how far will they go to keep Pip from the truth?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am posting three book reviews, of which this is the second. This book review is for Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each of them. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Moonflower Murders Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This is the kind of mystery that I really enjoy, someone gets murdered and another goes missing and it all relates back to the hotel they both have a connection to and because of this hotel there’s only a certain number of suspects. It reminds me of Agatha Christie style murder mysteries and they are just my favourite.The plot itself is really engaging, although the book is about 600 pages long I flew through it because it is so complex and so well created that the mystery surrounds you and you can’t stop reading until it is solved.

Moonflower Murders Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There’s too many characters to talk about them here individually but each and every one of them I went through thinking they were a suspect, except for the detective of course, and they are so well created that any one of them could have been the killer. I enjoyed getting to know each of the characters better because they each had their own part to play in the story which meant I got to see a lot of each of them.

Moonflower Murders Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I really enjoyed Anthony Horowitz’s writing style, it lended itself well to the mystery. One thing that I didn’t like as much was the inclusion of the entire Atticus Pund takes the case story, I felt it was a bit unnecessary.

Moonflower Murders Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars because it was a great read and a very enjoyable mystery.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Featuring his famous literary detective Atticus Pund and Susan Ryeland, hero of the worldwide bestseller Magpie Murders, a brilliantly complex literary thriller with echoes of Agatha Christie from New York Times bestselling author Anthony Horowitz.

Retired publisher Susan Ryeland is living the good life. She is running a small hotel on a Greek island with her long-term boyfriend Andreas. It should be everything she’s always wanted. But is it? She’s exhausted with the responsibilities of making everything work on an island where nothing ever does, and truth be told she’s beginning to miss London.

And then the Trehearnes come to stay. The strange and mysterious story they tell, about an unfortunate murder that took place on the same day and in the same hotel in which their daughter was married—a picturesque inn on the Suffolk coast named Farlingaye Halle—fascinates Susan and piques her editor’s instincts. 

One of her former writers, the late Alan Conway, author of the fictional Magpie Murders, knew the murder victim—an advertising executive named Frank Parris—and once visited Farlingaye Hall. Conway based the third book in his detective series, Atticus Pund Takes the Cake, on that very crime. 

The Trehearne’s, daughter, Cecily, read Conway’s mystery and believed the book proves that the man convicted of Parris’s murder—a Romanian immigrant who was the hotel’s handyman—is innocent. When the Trehearnes reveal that Cecily is now missing, Susan knows that she must return to England and find out what really happened.

Brilliantly clever, relentlessly suspenseful, full of twists that will keep readers guessing with each revelation and clue, Moonflower Murders is a deviously dark take on vintage English crime fiction from one of its greatest masterminds, Anthony Horowitz.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Way Of All Flesh by Ambrose Parry

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you’re all having a good day today. So today is Monday which means I’ll be posting book reviews, three of them actually. But I also would like your opinion, I haven’t shared any of my art on here but I do paint and use pens and things like that. I’m thinking of creating some things and maybe opening a shop like on Etsy or something – I just wanted to get some opinions on that. So let me know what you think in the comments and if you have any suggestions for things you might like to see.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Way of All Flesh Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This novel throws you into the plot as soon as it begins, the first chapter is an intriguing hook that propelled me through the reading of this book. There were so many tiny details that were thread throughout the text which tied together and made sense when the mystery, and the killer, was finally revealed. I did end up guessing who the killer was before the end but with this book it didn’t matter too much because the story was so engaging anyway.

The Way of All Flesh Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

With this book I had the feeling that I wasn’t going to like the two main characters, and at the start I really didn’t. I thought the male character was obnoxious and very unlikeable and the main female character was the same. She did not like that the male character was judging her because she was a servant and a woman, yet she automatically judged him just because he was richer than her and a man. It took a while to get past my feelings on this but by the end of the book I liked the characters more.

The Way of All Flesh Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book is set in the Victorian Era and thankfully the writing reflects this very well. It was clear and matched both the setting and the characters in the way that it should.

The Way of All Flesh Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I enjoyed reading it and I am looking forward to reading the next two in the series.

Blurb/Synopsis:

A vivid and gripping historical crime novel set in 19th century Edinburgh, from husband-and-wife writing team Chris Brookmyre and Marisa Haetzman.

Edinburgh, 1847. City of Medicine, Money, Murder.

Young women are being discovered dead across the Old Town, all having suffered similarly gruesome ends. In the New Town, medical student Will Raven is about to start his apprenticeship with the brilliant and renowned Dr Simpson.

Simpson’s patients range from the richest to the poorest of this divided city. His house is like no other, full of visiting luminaries and daring experiments in the new medical frontier of anaesthesia. It is here that Raven meets housemaid Sarah Fisher, who recognises trouble when she sees it and takes an immediate dislike to him. She has all of his intelligence but none of his privileges, in particular his medical education.

With each having their own motive to look deeper into these deaths, Raven and Sarah find themselves propelled headlong into the darkest shadows of Edinburgh’s underworld, where they will have to overcome their differences if they are to make it out alive.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Get A Life Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am bringing you a book review for Get A Life Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert. This is a very popular romance book that I read as part of the Thousand Doors readathon which was hosted by TeaBooksandTamzyn, Drinkingbymyshelf and MegwithBooks on YouTube.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Get A Life Chloe Brown Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As anyone who looks on my blog often will know, I am not the biggest fan of romance books. However, I did enjoy reading Get A Life Chloe Brown. The whole make a list of things to help me get a life that Chloe Brown made was something that gave the plot the substance I was looking for. It created a great situation for Chloe and the love interest to engage with each other, it wasn’t forced like I expected it to be. The thing that I loved the most about this book was the humour, there’s a lot of witty conversations in this book and that is the main thing that kept my interest. Also, I think this book counts as enemies to lovers and that’s one of my favourite tropes.

Get A Life Chloe Brown Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The main character, Chloe, is a very interesting character to follow, she’s stubborn and fiery and is a great example of disabled representation. Red is a good love interest, he didn’t quite keep my interest – not as much as chloe, and I did feel that some moments he acts out of character or he overreacts to create the tension in the book when he doesn’t need to and that did stop me loving the book. I also love that we see a few scenes with Chloe’s sisters and that gives the book something extra because it’s not all focused on the romance.

Get A Life Chloe Brown Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As I said, there’s a lot of humour in this book and I will say that if the writing style had been different and less humour I would not have finished this book.

Get A Life Chloe Brown Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars because it was a romance book that I actually slightly enjoyed reading.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Chloe Brown is a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan, and a list. After almost—but not quite—dying, she’s come up with seven directives to help her “Get a Life”, and she’s already completed the first: finally moving out of her glamorous family’s mansion. The next items?

• Enjoy a drunken night out.
• Ride a motorcycle.
• Go camping.
• Have meaningless but thoroughly enjoyable sex.
• Travel the world with nothing but hand luggage.
• And… do something bad.

But it’s not easy being bad, even when you’ve written step-by-step guidelines on how to do it correctly. What Chloe needs is a teacher, and she knows just the man for the job.

Redford ‘Red’ Morgan is a handyman with tattoos, a motorcycle, and more sex appeal than ten-thousand Hollywood heartthrobs. He’s also an artist who paints at night and hides his work in the light of day, which Chloe knows because she spies on him occasionally. Just the teeniest, tiniest bit.

But when she enlists Red in her mission to rebel, she learns things about him that no spy session could teach her. Like why he clearly resents Chloe’s wealthy background. And why he never shows his art to anyone. And what really lies beneath his rough exterior…

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews, Uncategorized

Book Review: The Appeal by Janice Hallett

Happy Monday bookish people! It’s Monday again which means it’s time for more book reviews. This weekend I was taking part in the 1000 doors readathon where I intended to read nine books, I did not manage this I actually only managed five before I got too tired.

The first of these books was The Appeal by Janice Hallett.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Appeal Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I loved how unique this plot was, you as the reader get to see the case exactly how the detectives are seeing it as they try to solve the murder. I was shocked by the end of this book because although part of it was exactly what I thought it would be but I didn’t predict it all which I loved. Discovering the story through the ‘evidence’ found after the murder made this a very unique mystery and I enjoyed trying to figure it out.

The Appeal Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Because of how this book was laid out each of the characters felt like they had their own personal voice and I liked that because it felt more intimate than some mystery books do, I felt like I got a lot more background into the characters for me to base my opinion on.

The Appeal Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I loved the uniqueness of the writing in this book. It was laid out in emails and text messages and not only did this make it easier for me to understand the characters and their motivations but also splitting it up into chunks made the complex plot manageable.

The Appeal Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall. I liked the uniqueness of the writing and the complex details of the plot but I do think some of the aspects could have been slightly less predictable.

Blurb/SYnopsis:

IN A TOWN FULL OF SECRETS
SOMEONE WAS MURDERED.
SOMEONE WENT TO PRISON.
AND EVERYONE’S A SUSPECT.
CAN YOU UNCOVER THE TRUTH?

Dear Reader,

Enclosed are documents relating to the events surrounding the Fairway Players’ staging of All My Sons, and the tragic death of one of its members. Another member is currently in prison for the crime. We have reason to suspect that they are innocent, and that there were far darker secrets that have yet to be revealed.

We believe that the killer has given themselves away. It’s there in writing, hidden in the emails, texts, and letters. In the events surrounding the charity appeal for little Poppy Reswick, and the question of whether that money was truly being used to fund her life-saving cancer treatment. Will you accept the challenge? Can you uncover the truth? Do you dare?

The standout debut thriller of 2021 that delivers multiple brilliant twists, and will change the way you think about the modern crime novel. 

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: Girl, 11 by Amy Suiter Clarke

Happy Thursday bookish people! I am very excited that today is my spot on the book tour for Girl, 11 by Amy Suiter Clarke. Thank you to Pushkin Vertigo for sending me a copy of this book to read and review.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Girl, 11 Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This novel is full of tension and mystery. The further into it I got the deeper into the world I fell. I was feeling the anticipation, the terror, I felt the moment that the mystery was taking a turn. I couldn’t read this book at night because – one, I was completely gripped by the story and two, because it would have scared me too much for me to be able to sleep – that’s how good the mystery is. I also love the use of podcasts that are in crime fiction novels at the moment.

Girl, 11 Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The main character in this book is Elle, I loved her as a character. She has the determination to keep going with the podcast to get justice and the strength her character needed throughout was something that made this book feel incredibly real. Also, there’s a big twist about her character that I did not see coming but I loved it.

Girl, 11 Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I loved the writing of this novel, the way that the chapters were interspersed with the transcripts for the podcasts was a very clever way of explaining what happened with the murders in the past without putting in too much exposition.

Girl, 11 Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because it hooked me completely and the ending was very satisfactory for me.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Once a social worker specializing in kids who were the victims of violent crime, Elle Castillo is now the host of a popular true crime podcast that tackles cold cases of missing children in her hometown of the Twin Cities. After two seasons of successfully solving cases, Elle decides to tackle her white whale—The Countdown Killer. Twenty years ago, TCK abruptly stopped after establishing a pattern of taking and ritualistically murdering three girls over seven days, each a year younger than the last. No one’s ever known why—why he stopped with his eleventh victim, a girl of eleven years old, or why he followed the ritual at all.

When a listener phones in with a tip, Elle sets out to interview him, only to discover his dead body. And within days, a child is abducted following the original TCK MO. Unlike the experts in the media and law enforcement who have always spun theories of a guilty suicide, Elle never believed TCK had died, and her investigation was meant to lay that suspicion to rest. But instead, her podcast seems to be kicking up new victims.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Gauntlet and the Fist Beneath by Ian Green

Happy Tuesday bookish people! I’m very excited that today is my spot on the blog tour for The Gauntlet and the Fist Beneath by Ian Green. Thank you to Head of Zeus for sending me a copy of this book to read and review.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Gauntlet and the Fist Beneath Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I loved the uniqueness of this book’s plot. I had never read a book like this before. One of the things I most enjoyed about this book was it’s fantastic world-building. I felt completely engrossed in the world that Ian Green created and I read through this book so quickly because I had to know what was going to happen next. I loved that this book opened with an action scene, it hooked me in without me even realizing it.

The Gauntlet and the Fist Beneath Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There are many characters within this book and they all have a role to play, their personalities are very well created and balance against each other well. The main character that I was drawn to was Flore, there are so many layers to her character and I felt all of her emotions along with her.

The Gauntlet and the Fist Beneath Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The writing is one of the best I have read, it is clear and smooth and despite complex characters and plot lines I didn’t get confused at all, which with some fantasy books I do sometimes.

The Gauntlet and the Fist Beneath Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I enjoyed my reading experience and I thought the world-building was masterful.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Fight the Storm.
Protect your people.
The endless rotstorm rages over the ruins of the Ferron Empire. Floré would never let the slavers of
the Empire rise again. As a warrior of the Stormguard Commandos, she wrought horrors in the
rotstorm to protect her people. She did her duty and left the bloodshed behind.
Fight for your family.
Floré’s peace is shattered when blazing orbs of light cut through the night sky and descend on her
village. Her daughter is abducted and Floré is forced into a chase across a land of twisted monsters
and ancient gods. She must pursue the mysterious orbs, whose presence could herald the return of the
Empire she spent her entire life fighting.
Destroy your enemies.
Now, Floré must take up the role she had sworn to put aside and become the weapon the Stormguard
trained her to be, to save not only her daughter, but her people…

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

blog tours, Book Reviews

Book Review: The Turnout by Megan Abbott

Happy Friday bookish people! Today is my spot on the book tour for The Turnout by Megan Abbott. Thank you to Grace Vincent and Virago books for sending me a copy to read and review.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Turnout Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I was so excited to get to read this book, I have always liked ballet and this continues with literary ballet plots as well. I loved how this book takes you through the story, the things that you think are important aren’t always and the things you think aren’t important may turn out to be much more important than you think. One of the parts I enjoyed the most was the exploration of the relationship between the sisters, there was a beautiful balance between the ballet, the changing mystery and the character relationships. It all paired together brilliantly.
I especially liked how the psychological mystery escalated with the timeline heading towards the end performance of The Nutcracker, I could feel the tension building with every page.

The Turnout Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There’s four main characters in this book, Dara, Marie, Charlie and Derek – each one has their own personal experiences that they are struggling with and this is threaded through the story intricately. I must admit I didn’t like Dara for most of the book but by the end I understood her and why she was the way she was.

The Turnout Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I didn’t think I was going to get along that well with the style of this writing however, I found myself being completely absorbed in it, and so the story. The writing style was the perfect compliment to the mystery that was unfolding.

The Turnout Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because, although some parts were predictable, I enjoyed the journey that this book took me on.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Bestselling and award-winning author Megan Abbott’s revelatory, mesmerizing, and game-changing new novel set against the hothouse of a family-run ballet studio, and an interloper who arrives to bring down the carefully crafted Eden-like facade.

Ballet flows through their veins. Dara and Marie Durant were dancers since birth, with their long necks and matching buns and pink tights, homeschooled and trained by their mother. Decades later the Durant School of Dance is theirs. The two sisters, together with Charlie, Dara’s husband and once their mother’s prize student, inherited the school after their parents died in a tragic accident nearly a dozen years ago. Marie, warm and soft, teaches the younger students; Dara, with her precision, trains the older ones; and Charlie, back broken after years of injuries, rules over the back office. Circling around each other, the three have perfected a dance, six days a week, that keeps the studio thriving. But when a suspicious accident occurs, just at the onset of the school’s annual performance of The Nutcracker, a season of competition, anxiety, and exhilaration, an interloper arrives and threatens the delicate balance of everything they’ve worked for.

Taut and unnerving, The Turnout is Megan Abbott at the height of her game. With uncanny insight and hypnotic writing, it is a sharp and strange dissection of family ties and sexuality, femininity and power, and a tale that is both alarming and irresistible.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!