Book Reviews

Book Review – Pages and Co: Tilly and the Lost Fairytales by Anna James

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day so far. Today I am bringing you a book review for the second book in the Pages and Co series by Anna James.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Tilly and the Lost Fairytales Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This book picks up from where the first book finished or very close to it at least. The idea of fairytales and fairy tale characters disappearing was what really caught my attention in this book, I felt drawn into the mystery of what was happening to them and I was invested in what the outcome would be. I liked that this book developed on plot points from the first book and that some of the things in the first book turned out to not be quite as they seemed. The world was also something that I loved being able to discover more of it, in terms of its rules and the politics surrounding everything, it added a lot of needed tension. At some points I felt that the mystery was too vague in a way and that there were a few things that needed to be explained more but I am hoping they will be in future books.

Tilly and the Lost Fairytales Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Tilly is a great main character. She is headstrong and somehow finds trouble no matter what she is doing. I felt for her in a lot of ways, the first book left her with a lot of questions and this impacted her a lot throughout this book. The other main character is her best friend Oscar, and I love their relationship. They work great together but they also have differing opinions which keeps their friendship realistic.

Tilly and the Lost Fairytales Writing and Dialogue:

Anna James’ writing is a style that I enjoy because it doesn’t feel like it has been simplified for its intended audience of middle grade readers, some books I have read in the past have done this.

Tilly and the Lost Fairytales Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because its a very comforting series to dive into and I am excited to pick up the third book.

Blurb/Synopsis:

A magical adventure to delight the imagination. The curl-up-on-the-sofa snuggle of a series from a uniquely talented author.

Tilly Pages is a bookwanderer; she can travel inside books, and even talk to the characters she meets there. But Tilly’s powers are put to the test when fairytales start leaking book magic and causing havoc . . . 

On a wintery visit to Paris, Tilly and her best friend Oskar bravely bookwander into the land of fairytales to find that characters are getting lost, stories are all mixed-up, and mysterious plot holes are opening without warning. Can Tilly work out who, or what, is behind the chaos so everyone gets their happily-ever-after?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review – The Killings At Kingfisher Hill

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you are all having a good day today. I am bringing you a new book review, I say new; I read this book in January I think and I am only just getting around to writing the review for it but nevermind, I am doing it now.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Killings At Kingfisher Hill Plot:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

So, I fully intended to love this book because I have always loved the Agatha Christie Poirot books and I was very excited when Sophie Hannah began writing them and I have read one of the others in the series which I enjoyed. However, my main issue with this book was that I felt it was quite predictable. The book starts with the bus/coach journey that stops at different places and there are a lot of events that happen and characters introduced here but I felt like a lot of the twists were already revealed here, I am sure they were meant to be subtle so that when you see the twist later you can go back and see where it was built up in the plot but for me it wasn’t subtle enough. The actual book itself was enjoyable to read, I did like the story and the typical Agatha Christie mystery of a country estate and a limited group of possible killers.

The Killings At Kingfisher Hill Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The only character I can talk about without spoiling anything is Poirot. I think Sophie Hannah has brilliantly captured the essence of Poirot with his nuances and the parts of his character that make him instantly recognizable.

The Killings At Kingfisher Hill Writing and Dialogue:

As I said above, I enjoyed the book overall and I think this is a lot because of the writing of Sophie Hannah. She manages to get the feel of an Agatha Christie while still keeping the writing clear and easy to understand exactly what is happening.

The Killings At Kingfisher Hill Overall:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I gave this book three stars overall because I can say the book was good and I liked it but I didn’t like how predictable it felt to me.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Hercule Poirot is traveling by luxury passenger coach from London to the exclusive Kingfisher Hill estate. Richard Devonport has summoned the renowned detective to prove that his fiancée, Helen, is innocent of the murder of his brother, Frank. Poirot will have only days to investigate before Helen is hanged, but there is one strange condition attached: he must conceal his true reason for being there from the rest of the Devonport family.

The coach is forced to stop when a distressed woman demands to get off, insisting that if she stays in her seat, she will be murdered. Although the rest of the journey passes without anyone being harmed, Poirot’s curiosity is aroused, and his fears are later confirmed when a body is discovered with a macabre note attached . . .

Could this new murder and the peculiar incident on the coach be clues to solving the mystery of who killed Frank Devonport? And if Helen is innocent, can Poirot find the true culprit in time to save her from the gallows?

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review- Finlay Donovan Is Killing It by Elle Cosimano

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am bringing you a review of one of the few books I read in February, Finlay Donovan is Killing it by Elle Cosimano.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Finlay Donovan Is Killing It Plot:

For the first 100 pages I wasn’t sure what I thought of this book, there was so much happening in so few pages that it should have felt fast but it actually felt like it was pretty slow, it took me a week to read the first 100 pages but then I picked it up to read a bit more and ended up finishing the rest of the book in one sitting. So my opinion on it changed. I ended up loving it, the mystery had a twist that I did not see coming and it has a strong motive for Finlay, being her children and keeping her family together. It felt realistic and it was something that I really liked about this novel.

Finlay Donovan Is Killing It Characters:

So Finlay is the main character and she has a really great character arc, she has a focus on her children and her job and while her life is a mess at the beginning you see how hard she is trying to put it back together, I liked how relatable the character is even though the events of the novel aren’t realistic, it created a good balance.

Finlay Donovan Is Killing It Writing And Dialogue:

As I said the pace of the novel felt slow for the first part and that might be the writing a little but for the rest of the book the writing was excellent, clear and helped me to be dragged into the story.

Finlay Donovan Is Killing It Overall:

Overall I gave this book four stars because the second half was very entertaining but the first 100 pages let it down a little bit. I am excited to pick up the sequel as soon as possible.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Finlay Donovan is killing it…except, she’s really not. A stressed-out single mom of two and struggling novelist, Finlay’s life is in chaos: The new book she promised her literary agent isn’t written; her ex-husband fired the nanny without telling her; and this morning she had to send her four-year-old to school with hair duct-taped to her head after an incident with scissors.

When Finlay is overheard discussing the plot of her new suspense novel with her agent over lunch, she’s mistaken for a contract killer and inadvertently accepts an offer to dispose of a problem husband in order to make ends meet. She soon discovers that crime in real life is a lot more difficult than its fictional counterpart, as she becomes tangled in a real-life murder investigation.

Fast-paced, deliciously witty, and wholeheartedly authentic in depicting the frustrations and triumphs of motherhood in all its messiness, hilarity, and heartfelt moments, Finlay Donovan Is Killing It is the first in a brilliant new series from award-winning Elle Cosimano.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review – The Maid by Nita Prose

Happy Monday bookish people! Today I am so excited to be bringing you my book review of The Maid by Nita Prose, this was one of my most anticipated reads of this year and I was so excited to get around to it so early in the year.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Maid Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The premise of this book really excited me, a murder mystery set in a hotel where you follow the POV of Molly, the maid. The first half of this book really lived up to my expectations with a lot of plot twists and intriguing mystery that kept my attention. However, the second half of the book became quite predictable and the mystery sort of fizzled out for me by the end.

The Maid Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I really felt that I could relate to Molly, the maid with her friendly although a little socially awkward personality. One thing I should mention is that she is portrayed in a very similar way to an autistic character but I haven’t seen anything describing her as actually autistic. I was rooting for her character a lot, especially during the second half of the novel, she came into her bravery a lot there.

The Maid Writing and dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The writing in this book is so clear and smooth and enjoyable. The writing drew me in from the very first page.

The Maid Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I really enjoyed most of the plot but I felt the ending was a little disappointing.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Molly Gray is not like everyone else. She struggles with social skills and misreads the intentions of others. Her gran used to interpret the world for her, codifying it into simple rules that Molly could live by.

Since Gran died a few months ago, twenty-five-year-old Molly has been navigating life’s complexities all by herself. No matter—she throws herself with gusto into her work as a hotel maid. Her unique character, along with her obsessive love of cleaning and proper etiquette, make her an ideal fit for the job. She delights in donning her crisp uniform each morning, stocking her cart with miniature soaps and bottles, and returning guest rooms at the Regency Grand Hotel to a state of perfection.

But Molly’s orderly life is upended the day she enters the suite of the infamous and wealthy Charles Black, only to find it in a state of disarray and Mr. Black himself dead in his bed. Before she knows what’s happening, Molly’s unusual demeanor has the police targeting her as their lead suspect. She quickly finds herself caught in a web of deception, one she has no idea how to untangle. Fortunately for Molly, friends she never knew she had unite with her in a search for clues to what really happened to Mr. Black—but will they be able to find the real killer before it’s too late?

Clue-like, locked-room mystery and a heartwarming journey of the spirit, The Maid explores what it means to be the same as everyone else and yet entirely different—and reveals that all mysteries can be solved through connection to the human heart.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Monthly Wrap Ups

January Wrap Up!

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you all had a lovely January. If you have seen any of my recent posts here on my Instagram posts (@the_blind_scribe) you will know that my January has been full of ups and downs, honestly mostly downs. After being unwell for most of it and then my partner and I breaking up and having to move back in with my parents I barely read anything in January.

So, onto my January Wrap-up!

  • Four Dead Queens by Astrid Scholte – I did not read
  • A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik – I did not read
  • Act Your Age Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert – I did read!
  • Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare – I did not read
  • Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody – I did not read
  • Daughters of Night by Laura Shepard Robinson – I have recently started to read this, I won’t finish it by the end of the month but I am really enjoying the atmosphere and the lead female character so far.
  • The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton – I have not read
  • Empire of the Vampire by Jay Kristoff – I did not get around to reading
  • European Travels for the Monstrous Gentlewoman by Theodora Goss – I have read the first 20 pages or so of this book and I am enjoying it but I wasn’t in the right mood for it this month because of everything happening.
  • Finale by Stephanie Garber – I did not read
  • Furyborn by Claire Legrand – I did not read
  • The Killings at Kingfisher Hill by Sophie Hannah – I did read this!
  • Nevernight by Jay Kristoff – I did not read this
  • Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty – I did not read this
  • Pages and Co Tilly and the Lost Fairytales – I did read this!
  • Queenslayer by Sebastien De Castell – I did not read this
  • Shadowscent by P M Freestone – I did not read this
  • The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman – I did not read
  • The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi – I did not read
  • The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley – I did not read
  • The Plague Letters by V L Valentine – I did not read
  • Throne of Glass by Sarah J Maas – I did not read

I also read The Enchanted Wood, The Magic Faraway Tree and The Folk of the Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton which wasn’t on my TBR. So that means I read six books and I started two more so I am actually really happy with the amount that I ended up reading this month.

That’s it for this wrap up I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Pages and Co by Anna James

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you’re all having a good day today. I am all tucked up in bed not feeling too great but with a lovely stack of books next to me just waiting to be read. Today I am bringing you a book review of Pages and Co by Anna James.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Pages and Co Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Pages and Co is a story that focuses on Tilly, a young girl who lives with her Grandparents in their bookshop, who finds that there is a lot more magic in books than she thought possible. I loved the magic in this story, it embodies the wonder that children feel when reading and living the enchantment of books. It also carries a childlike innocence throughout that gives the whole story a lighter tone despite the serious moments. The plot of this book was so unique and it drew me in from the very first chapter

Pages and Co Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Tilly is the main character in this book, she is headstrong and adventurous. I loved following her as she discovers where her life is going. I felt that Tilly had a great character arc in this story but also I think her character still has a lot of room for growth in the rest of the series. Something else I loved about the characters in this book is the friendship between Tilly and Oskar.

Pages and Co Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

There’s not a lot that I can say about this other than it was clear and smooth and I felt that the writing helped to carry the plot on.

Pages and Co Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I really enjoyed the story and I am excited to continue reading the series (at the time of reading this I have already read the second book in the series).

Blurb/Synopsis:

A magical adventure to delight the imagination. A curl-up-on-the-sofa debut from a uniquely talented author.

Eleven year-old Tilly has lived above her grandparents’ bookshop ever since her mother disappeared shortly after she was born. Like the rest of her family, Tilly loves nothing more than to escape into the pages of her favourite stories.

One day Tilly realises that classic children’s characters are appearing in the shop through the magic of `book wandering’ – crossing over from the page into real life.

With the help of Anne of Green Gables and Alice in Wonderland. Tilly is determined to solve the mystery of what happened to her mother all those years ago, so she bravely steps into the unknown, unsure of what adventure lies ahead and what dangers she may face.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews

Book Review: Murder On Christmas Eve

Happy Monday bookish people! Today is a very busy and exciting day for me, I am going with my sister to see her try on wedding dresses. But before that I am here to share a book review or two, starting with Murder on Christmas Eve – an anthology of short stories all set on Christmas Eve.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Murder on Christmas Eve Plot:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I will start by saying I don’t think there was a story in this anthology that I didn’t enjoy. My favourite of them being the one about the cat, The book isn’t near me now so I can’t check the title but if you read the book then you’ll know exactly which one I mean. There isn’t much more I can say about the plot except to reiterate how much I really enjoyed it.

Murder on Christmas Eve Characters:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

This category is also hard to describe because there are so many characters throughout the stories but there is a wide range, old, young, tall, short, the villains aren’t always who you expect it to be and I loved that.

Murder on Christmas Eve Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Each of the stories are written by different authors, some of which I had read before and others that I hadn’t. It was nice to read some work by new authors and start to enjoy their texts.

Murder on Christmas Eve:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because it kept me very entertained while on a car journey. Each of the stories are very intriguing and contain great mmysteries.

Blurb:

Christmas Eve. While the world sleeps, snow falls gently from the sky, presents await under the tree … and murder is afoot. In this collection of ten classic murder mysteries from the best crime writers in history, death and mayhem take many festive forms, from the inventive to the unexpected.

From a Santa Claus with a grudge to a cat who knows who killed its owner on Christmas Eve, these are stories to enjoy – and be mystified by – in front of a roaring fire, mince pie to hand.

The trinity cat / Ellis Peters —
The Santa Claus Club / Julian Symons —
The four seasons / Michael Innes —
No sanity clause / Ian Rankin —
The footprint in the sky / John Dickson Carr —
A wife in a million / Val McDermid —
The dagger with wings / G.K. Chesterton —
Cambric tea / Marjorie Bowen —
As dark as Christmas gets / Lawrence Block —
On Christmas day in the morning / Margery Allingham

Book Reviews

Book Review: Act Your Age Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert

Happy Monday bookish people! I hope you’re all having a good day today. It is the new year and I am getting around to putting up my first book review of the year! The book review is for Act Your Age Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert and it is the final book in the Brown Sisters Trilogy.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little bit about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Act Your Age Eve Brown Plot:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Okay so first I will admit that I only started this trilogy so that I could read this particular book. I thought the description of Eve was something that I could relate to and the grumpy and sunshine trope was something I hadn’t read before.

Now my actual reading of this book wasn’t as enjoyable as I hoped it would be. The beginning was something I did enjoy, with the introduction of Jacob and the setting of the Inn. It felt very warm and cosy and I was looking forward to the romance of it, which is very rare for me. However, one of the things that I really don’t like in books is when drama is added for the sake of having drama and that is what it felt like at some points in this book. A good point for it though is that it has representation of autism that I felt was good.

Act Your Age Eve Brown Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Eve was my second favourite of the sisters, Chloe being my favourite, and I loved her bubbly personality and how she went from being supported by her parents and having no confidence in herself to how she is at the end of the book. Jacob is the love interest in this book, he is the grumpy character at the beginning and I liked how he was represented.

Act Your Age Eve Brown Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Talia Hibbert’s writing is very enjoyable because of it’s witty dialogue and humour. It was clear and well structured.

Act Your Age Eve Brown Overall:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I am giving the book three stars overall because it didn’t quite live up to my expectations but I did really enjoy the characters and the dialogue.

In Act Your Age, Eve Brown the flightiest Brown sister crashes into the life of an uptight B&B owner and has him falling hard—literally.

Eve Brown is a certified hot mess. No matter how hard she strives to do right, her life always goes horribly wrong—so she’s given up trying. But when her personal brand of chaos ruins an expensive wedding (someone had to liberate those poor doves), her parents draw the line. It’s time for Eve to grow up and prove herself—even though she’s not entirely sure how…

Jacob Wayne is in control. Always. The bed and breakfast owner’s on a mission to dominate the hospitality industry—and he expects nothing less than perfection. So when a purple-haired tornado of a woman turns up out of the blue to interview for his open chef position, he tells her the brutal truth: not a chance in hell. Then she hits him with her car—supposedly by accident. Yeah, right.

Now his arm is broken, his B&B is understaffed, and the dangerously unpredictable Eve is fluttering around, trying to help. Before long, she’s infiltrated his work, his kitchen—and his spare bedroom. Jacob hates everything about it. Or rather, he should. Sunny, chaotic Eve is his natural-born nemesis, but the longer these two enemies spend in close quarters, the more their animosity turns into something else. Like Eve, the heat between them is impossible to ignore—and it’s melting Jacob’s frosty exterior.

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Book Reviews, Bookmas 2021

Merry Bookmas day 23 – 23rd December – Book Review: The Christmas Murder Game by Alexandra Benedict

Happy Thursday everyone! Merry Bookmas day 23! Today is going to be very busy for me because it is my sister’s birthday so I will be spending most of the day with her and making her birthday cake.

But for all of you I am bringing you a book review of The Christmas Murder Game by Alexandra Benedict.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

The Christmas Murder Game Plot:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The plot of this book is basically that the Grandmother of the main character, Lily, dies and some of the family are invited to take part in a game to find twelve keys and the winner gets the deeds for the house but then there is a murder. There were so many elements to this plot that I usually like, such as locked room mysteries, isolated settings for murder mysteries, so I thought that I would love this book. It gave me the feeling of a modern take on an Agatha Christie but for me it felt almost too similar to her book – And Then There Were None, it also felt quite similar to The Inheritance Game. The other thing that wasn’t the best about this book was that I had guessed the ending within the first 100 pages. This book was okay but I don’t think I would reread it – except to use it for my PhD.

The Christmas Murder Game Characters:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

So Lily is the main character in this book, I won’t give my thoughts on any of the other characters because it could give away the story, and for most of the book I enjoyed her character. She is exceptionally good at riddles and I liked seeing her thought process behind each one. However, I was hoping for a better character arc for her. I was hoping her character would grow in confidence but this only happened a little.

The Christmas Murder Game Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The writing was one of the best parts about this book. It was clear and flowed really well and the dialogue brought out the personalities of the characters.

The Christmas Murder Game Overall:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I gave this book three stars overall because it wasn’t a bad book it just felt like I was reading something I had already read before.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Twelve clues.
Twelve keys.
Twelve days of Christmas.
But who will survive until Twelfth Night?

Lily Armitage never intended to return to Endgame House – the grand family home where her mother died twenty-one Christmases ago. Until she receives a letter from her aunt, asking her to return to take part in an annual tradition: the Christmas Game. The challenge? Solve twelve clues, to find twelve keys. The prize? The deeds to the manor house.

Lily has no desire to win the house. But her aunt makes one more promise: The clues will also reveal who really killed Lily’s mother all those years ago.

So, for the twelve days of Christmas, Lily must stay at Endgame House with her estranged cousins and unravel the riddles that hold the key not just to the family home, but to its darkest secrets. However, it soon becomes clear that her cousins all have their own reasons for wanting to win the house – and not all of them are playing fair.

As a snowstorm cuts them off from the village, the game turns deadly. Soon Lily realises that she is no longer fighting for an inheritance, but for her life.

This Christmas is to die for . . . Let the game begin

That’s it for this book review, I hope you all enjoyed it!

Bookmas 2021

Merry Bookmas Day 20 – 20th December – BookReview: Mistletoe and Murder by Robin Stevens

Happy Monday bookish people! Merry bookmas day 20! Today I am bringing you a festive book review of Mistletoe and Murder by Robin Stevens. It is part of the Murder Most Unladylike Series.

In this book review I will give star ratings to four categories and I will write a little about each one. I will try to keep it as spoiler free as possible. I hope you enjoy my book review.

Mistletoe and Murder Plot:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

This book follows two girls, Hazel Wong and Daisy Wells, who normally attend a boarding school where they keep running into murder scenes. In this one book they are at Cambridge over the Christmas period and once again they get caught up in a murder. I loved the first half of this book. It had everything I wanted, a small cast of possible killers, the bedrooms and stairwell of the boys as location and all the cosy, wintry vibes I enjoy. It actually made me think of another children’s mystery series by Tanya Landman, the Poppy Fields mystery series. However, the ending completely ruined it for me. The end of the mystery was too neat and tidy, the motive just so happened to be what it was and it didn’t sit right with me. It was too conveniant.

Mistletoe and Murder Characters:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I really liked the two main characters. Hazel is much more quiet and reserved then daisy and I like the way their personalities bounced off of each other. Personally I don’t feel I would be friends with Daisy because she has a very outgoing personality and she can be quite bossy.

Mistletoe and Murder Writing and Dialogue:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The writing style in this book worked well for me. It was clear and flowed well, I read through it so quickly.

Mistletoe and Murder Overall:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I gave this book four stars overall because I enjoyed most of the book and although the ending was not as satisfying as I would like it to be I would definitely still read the rest of the series.

Blurb/Synopsis:

Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are spending the Christmas hols in snowy Cambridge. Hazel has high hopes of its beautiful spires, cosy libraries and inviting tea-rooms – but there is danger lurking in the dark stairwells of ancient Maudlin College.

Two days before Christmas, there is a terrible accident. At least, it appears to be an accident – until the Detective Society look a little closer, and realise a murder has taken place. Faced with several irritating grown-ups and fierce competition from a rival agency, they must use all their cunning and courage to find the killer (in time for Christmas Day, of course).

The fabulously festive fifth mystery from the bestselling, award-winning author of Murder Most Unladylike.

I hope you all enjoyed this book review!